August 3, 1967. LBJ’s frequent companion, Yuki the dog, accompanies him on his walk around the grounds with the press.
LBJ Library photo A4554-23, public domain. L-R: George Christian, President Lyndon B. Johnson, Yuki, Hon. Cyrus Vance, Lt. Gen. John Throckmorton. 

August 3, 1967. LBJ’s frequent companion, Yuki the dog, accompanies him on his walk around the grounds with the press.

LBJ Library photo A4554-23, public domain. L-R: George Christian, President Lyndon B. Johnson, Yuki, Hon. Cyrus Vance, Lt. Gen. John Throckmorton. 

July 6, 1967. Dan Rather and his family visit the Johnsons at the LBJ Ranch. 
LBJ Presidential Library photo #C5960-18, public domain. 

July 6, 1967. Dan Rather and his family visit the Johnsons at the LBJ Ranch. 

LBJ Presidential Library photo #C5960-18, public domain. 

June 25, 1967. The Glassboro summit is over: Kosygin departs, and LBJ heads to Philadelphia and from there back to the White House—with great haste. As per the Daily Diary:

“Take-off from Philadelphia for Washington, D.C.—This flight was to be speeded up as much as possible for the President was in a race w/ time, for he wanted to make his statement on live television at the White House prior to Chairman Kosygin’s televised Press Conference in New York…
"AF One 26000 landed at Washington National Airport, the MAC terminal. The President and the occupants of his helicopter quickly lined up at the back door of the plane so that they could go directly to the waiting helicopter with a minimum of time.  However, as the door opened, it was discovered that the steps had been placed, by mistake, at the front of the plane, so as the President and party raced through the plane, it could be heard over the intercom, ‘Make way for the President.’  As Frank Cormier who was in the press pool on board the plane, [noted] it looked almost like one of the old silent movies in which a comedy of errors occurred.”

Photo: LBJ finally makes his speech, with Lynda behind him and the White House dogs off to the right. #C5791-6A. LBJ Presidential Library. 

June 25, 1967. The Glassboro summit is over: Kosygin departs, and LBJ heads to Philadelphia and from there back to the White House—with great haste. As per the Daily Diary:

“Take-off from Philadelphia for Washington, D.C.—This flight was to be speeded up as much as possible for the President was in a race w/ time, for he wanted to make his statement on live television at the White House prior to Chairman Kosygin’s televised Press Conference in New York…

"AF One 26000 landed at Washington National Airport, the MAC terminal. The President and the occupants of his helicopter quickly lined up at the back door of the plane so that they could go directly to the waiting helicopter with a minimum of time.  However, as the door opened, it was discovered that the steps had been placed, by mistake, at the front of the plane, so as the President and party raced through the plane, it could be heard over the intercom, ‘Make way for the President.’  As Frank Cormier who was in the press pool on board the plane, [noted] it looked almost like one of the old silent movies in which a comedy of errors occurred.”

Photo: LBJ finally makes his speech, with Lynda behind him and the White House dogs off to the right. #C5791-6A. LBJ Presidential Library. 

June 13, 1967. LBJ nominates Thurgood Marshall as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court in a ceremony in the Rose Garden (audio here—listen for the birds and sirens in the distance!). LBJ and Solicitor General Marshall then accompany the press inside for the President’s news conference. LBJ fields questions on the resolution of the Six-Day War and the importance of the hot line, the attack on the USS Liberty, Vietnam, and growing violence in the cities—which is about to get much, much, worse.  
LBJ Presidential Library #A4275-11, public domain. 

June 13, 1967. LBJ nominates Thurgood Marshall as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court in a ceremony in the Rose Garden (audio here—listen for the birds and sirens in the distance!). LBJ and Solicitor General Marshall then accompany the press inside for the President’s news conference. LBJ fields questions on the resolution of the Six-Day War and the importance of the hot linethe attack on the USS LibertyVietnam, and growing violence in the cities—which is about to get much, much, worse.  

LBJ Presidential Library #A4275-11, public domain. 

June 2, 1967. LBJ and visiting UK Prime Minister Harold Wilson read news off the ticker in the Oval Office. LBJ has opened the door of the cabinet so he can see news which has just been printed even before it rolls up to the viewing window at the top of the machine.
Photo A4216-7, LBJ Presidential Library.

June 2, 1967. LBJ and visiting UK Prime Minister Harold Wilson read news off the ticker in the Oval Office. LBJ has opened the door of the cabinet so he can see news which has just been printed even before it rolls up to the viewing window at the top of the machine.

Photo A4216-7, LBJ Presidential Library.

May 12, 1967. The President’s secretary recording the Daily Diary (probably Marie Fehmer) writes a beautifully detailed description of dinner conversation at LBJ’s table. Also present are Sen. Russell and aide Harry McPherson. 

"At dinner, the President told Senator Russell that what he needed to talk to him about was Vietnam …The President outlined three choices open to him: 

'1. I can move further in the North—but they tell me that moving further in the north with the bombing will result in only killing civilians and will not accomplish anything that we've not already accomplished. 2. I can concentrate completely on the DMZ. 3. I can concentrate on the areas between the seventeenth and twentieth parallels and make my planes make that a desert. Just destroy anything that moves.'

Senator Russell feels that dragging this out each day leans more toward getting us in a big war. ‘We’ve just got to finish it soon.’ said the Senator, ‘because time is working against you both here and there.’ The Senator suggested that his feeling was that the only way to end the war was to blockade the ports and stop their lines of supply…The President expressed sincere belief that this would get us into war sooner than anything. He also felt that number (1) above would get us into war. ‘The only thing left to take out up there,’ said the President, ‘is a power plant which is located 1/2 mile from Ho’s headquarters. Suppose we missed,’ said the President.

The President then asked the Senator about Lester Maddox. The President told him, ‘Well, I watched him on Face the Nation last Sunday, and just decided that he definitely was not Georgia quality.’ The Senator said that Gov. Maddox was a child of fortune, just lucky, and couldn’t have beaten any other man in the race except the one he did beat.

After his talk w/ Amb. Clark, the President affirmed his belief that he was a ‘Holt and Menzies man.’ Sen. Russell said that he hoped Holt was an LBJ man because he knew that he won eight seats at least as a result of the President’s visit there. The President said that when Holt was here he stood up and said, ‘All the Way with LBJ.’ The President appreciated that, but then took him aside, and said, ‘Now listen, I don’t want you to become a casualty. If you are lost, then I lose a good friend. They’ll murder you back home.’ ‘No, sir,’ replied the Prime Minister, ‘That’s the way it’s going to be.’ ‘And so it is,’ said the President. 

The President then launched into a tirade against the newspaper reporters who follow him around at receptions. He explained to Senator Russell that Liz Carpenter’s procedure is to invite about 25 of them as guests to each reception type function and then allow a press pool to cover the whole thing. The President said that he can’t even swallow a mouthful of food without having one of them watch to see if he chewed it properly before swallowing. He said that all we’re doing is inviting 500 guests, standing them before the wall, and then making them be gracious to the 25 who come up to them and ask questions like, ’Are you happy here? Why are you here? Will you come next time? Are you a friend of the family? Isn’t the service worse here than it used to be? Isn’t the coffee weak?’ 

At midnight. Senator Russell stood up and said. ‘Mr. President, it’s midnight, and I have to go to bed because I’m an old man, and you have to go to bed because you’re President of the United States.’”

Top: Marie Fehmer; middle, l-r: Sen. Russell, Lester Maddox, Holt and LBJ; bottom,  Liz Carpenter in her office. 

March 31, 1967. LBJ signs the Ratification of the Consular Convention in the Oval Office. 
LBJ Presidential Library photo A3928-6a. 

March 31, 1967. LBJ signs the Ratification of the Consular Convention in the Oval Office. 

LBJ Presidential Library photo A3928-6a. 

He [LBJ] also read an editorial in the Sunday Star-Bulletin & Advertiser (of Honolulu, Hawaii) by William F. Buckley, Jr—“Anti-American Theme”— He told mary s and mf to be sure and read the article to see what “your young friends on the left” are doing. He was upset by the references to his own inadequacies in contrast to the glories of the JFK myth and explained that in JFK’s three years little had been done, and went on to enumerate his own successes in the legislative field.

Then the President took two equanil and said that if he couldn’t sleep, he’d get up and work, but he hoped that sleep would come.

The President’s Daily Diary for March 19, 1967. LBJ and his staff are on their way to Guam on Air Force One for a conference with South Vietnamese leaders and members of the US mission to South Vietnam.

March 14, 1967. Lady Bird (in the green dress) and her entourage of 50 or more reporters descend on the Mathis family during her visit to North Carolina.
The First Lady talks with family members about favorite television programs, the garden at the Ranch, and how the children like the Teacher Corps teachers in their school. Lady Bird presents Mrs. Mathis with preserves and honey from the ranch “wrapped incongruously in the elegant embossed paper from the White House.”
LBJ Library Photo #C4719-3, public domain. Lady Bird quote from A White House Dairy. 

March 14, 1967. Lady Bird (in the green dress) and her entourage of 50 or more reporters descend on the Mathis family during her visit to North Carolina.

The First Lady talks with family members about favorite television programs, the garden at the Ranch, and how the children like the Teacher Corps teachers in their school. Lady Bird presents Mrs. Mathis with preserves and honey from the ranch “wrapped incongruously in the elegant embossed paper from the White House.”

LBJ Library Photo #C4719-3, public domain. Lady Bird quote from A White House Dairy. 

March 6, 1967. LBJ and Lady Bird, along with aide Jake Jacobsen and others, leave the LBJ Ranch for San Antonio and thence to Washington  Along the way, according to the Daily Diary, they engage in some subterfuge in aid of LBJ’s teeth. 

"8:56 PM. Arrive the LBJ Ranch—bid farewell to Luci and Pat and walked to the waiting Jetstar—The President came on board saying, ‘Jake, everything fine?’ To Jake’s reply that everything was fine, the President said that it certainly wasn’t with him—he had lost a tooth while eating a piece of candy—actually the crown of a tooth had come out.
"9:14 PM. President and Mrs. Johnson arrived Randolph AF Base, San Antonio, Texas. A dentist, Dr. Henry Pelc, FR 55820, 3510 USAF Hospital, RAFB, Tex, boarded AF One to look at the President’s tooth. To throw the press off as to the reason for delay, baggage was still being loaded. The plane taxied to the end of the runway when the dentist had finished and he went out the escape hatch behind the pilot’s seat to avoid being seen by the press. (Note: The dentist was in his dress uniform as he had been at a cocktail party when contacted.)"

LBJ Library photo #C3936-8, from 11/23/66, photographer snapping photos of LBJ’s Jetstar. Public domain. 

March 6, 1967. LBJ and Lady Bird, along with aide Jake Jacobsen and others, leave the LBJ Ranch for San Antonio and thence to Washington  Along the way, according to the Daily Diary, they engage in some subterfuge in aid of LBJ’s teeth. 

"8:56 PM. Arrive the LBJ Ranch—bid farewell to Luci and Pat and walked to the waiting Jetstar—The President came on board saying, ‘Jake, everything fine?’ To Jake’s reply that everything was fine, the President said that it certainly wasn’t with him—he had lost a tooth while eating a piece of candy—actually the crown of a tooth had come out.

"9:14 PM. President and Mrs. Johnson arrived Randolph AF Base, San Antonio, Texas. A dentist, Dr. Henry Pelc, FR 55820, 3510 USAF Hospital, RAFB, Tex, boarded AF One to look at the President’s tooth. To throw the press off as to the reason for delay, baggage was still being loaded. The plane taxied to the end of the runway when the dentist had finished and he went out the escape hatch behind the pilot’s seat to avoid being seen by the press. (Note: The dentist was in his dress uniform as he had been at a cocktail party when contacted.)"

LBJ Library photo #C3936-8, from 11/23/66, photographer snapping photos of LBJ’s Jetstar. Public domain. 

December 4, 1966. LBJ speaks with John Steinbeck, who is soon to travel to Vietnam. He will stay for five months, until April 1967. As you can tell from this conversation, the President and Steinbeck were very friendly—Lady Bird and Elaine Steinbeck, John’s wife, both attended the University of Texas, and LBJ and John had taken to each other at their first meeting in 1963. The Steinbecks also appear in at least two of Mrs. Johnson’s home movies of the Johnson family and their friends at Camp David, one from 1965 and one from 1967. John Steinbeck, who  won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1962, also received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1964.  
Steinbeck was a staunch supporter of LBJ’s Vietnam policies. Both of Steinbeck’s sons served there, Thom and John, pictured above with his father and LBJ in the Oval Office. The Steinbecks visited the White House in May 1966, shortly before John’s deployment. 
While in Vietnam, the elder Steinbeck worked as a war correspondent for Newsday. Some of his columns from 1966-1967 were recently republished by the University of Virginia Press: you can listen to an interview with the book’s editor here. More on Steinbeck and LBJ here, via NARA’s Teaching with Documents. 
LBJ Presidential Library photo #A2439-4, 5/16/1966. Public domain. 

December 4, 1966. LBJ speaks with John Steinbeck, who is soon to travel to Vietnam. He will stay for five months, until April 1967. As you can tell from this conversation, the President and Steinbeck were very friendly—Lady Bird and Elaine Steinbeck, John’s wife, both attended the University of Texas, and LBJ and John had taken to each other at their first meeting in 1963. The Steinbecks also appear in at least two of Mrs. Johnson’s home movies of the Johnson family and their friends at Camp David, one from 1965 and one from 1967. John Steinbeck, who  won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1962, also received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1964.  

Steinbeck was a staunch supporter of LBJ’s Vietnam policies. Both of Steinbeck’s sons served there, Thom and John, pictured above with his father and LBJ in the Oval Office. The Steinbecks visited the White House in May 1966, shortly before John’s deployment. 

While in Vietnam, the elder Steinbeck worked as a war correspondent for Newsday. Some of his columns from 1966-1967 were recently republished by the University of Virginia Press: you can listen to an interview with the book’s editor here. More on Steinbeck and LBJ here, via NARA’s Teaching with Documents

LBJ Presidential Library photo #A2439-4, 5/16/1966. Public domain. 

President’s press conference, 11/4/1966

"QUESTION. Does the cancellation of your big campaign trip mean that you do not intend to do anything to help Democratic candidates before election, such as one little speech in Texas, or maybe a TV pep talk before election?

THE PRESIDENT. First, we don’t have any plans, so when you don’t have plans, you don’t cancel plans.

We get invited to come to most of the States. In the last 6 weeks we have been invited to 47 of the States by the candidates for Governor, or the Senate, or the Congress.

We have been invited on nonpolitical invitations to the other three States, I might say.

But we have not accepted those invitations. We do contact the local people who extend them. We do investigate in some instances going there, and we do express the hope that we can go.

But until it is firm, until we know we can, we do not say, “We accept,” and schedule it.

The people of this country ought to know that all these canceled plans primarily involve the imagination of people who phrase sentences and write columns, and have to report what they hope or what they imagine.

We have no plans for any political speeches between now and the election. We know of no requirement that we forgo them. I just don’t think they are necessary.” 

However, it had already been reported in the press that LBJ had planned a campaign trip to Massachusetts, Illinois, Nevada, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California, Montana, Wyoming and Colorado that was now cancelled. This discrepancy was used by Republicans as an example of the ”credibility gap” in the Johnson administration. This seeming disparity between what the White House said, or promised, and what it delivered, became an effective issue for Republicans as they tried to take back—or at least win more seats in—the House and Senate. 

Source: Congress and the Nation, Vol. II 1965-1968, Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Service, 1969, p. 7. Full press conference text available here

September 21, 1966. LBJ has a two-hour, off-the-record meeting with staff from the Washington Post. Left to right: Ben Bradlee, Russell Wiggins, Katharine (Kay) Graham, President Lyndon B. Johnson. 
LBJ was an old friend of the Grahams: you can listen to an excerpt of a telephone conversation with Kay from December 2, 1963, a few months after she took over the Post upon her husband’s death. 
LBJ Presidential Library photo A3178-13. Public domain.

September 21, 1966. LBJ has a two-hour, off-the-record meeting with staff from the Washington Post. Left to right: Ben Bradlee, Russell Wiggins, Katharine (Kay) Graham, President Lyndon B. Johnson. 

LBJ was an old friend of the Grahams: you can listen to an excerpt of a telephone conversation with Kay from December 2, 1963, a few months after she took over the Post upon her husband’s death. 

LBJ Presidential Library photo A3178-13. Public domain.