June 23, 1967. After the day of meetings at Glassboro, LBJ attends the President’s Club Dinner at the Century Plaza Hotel in Los Angeles, California. The President’s Club, which began during the Kennedy administration, is a fundraising group that provides funds directly to the President (not his party) to use for various political purposes, including campaigning. After the dinner, President Johnson flies to his ranch in Texas to spend the day before the summit meeting continues on June 25th.

More on the President’s Club in the Library’s oral histories of Arthur Krim, Chairman of the President’s Club from 1962-1968.

LBJ Presidential Library photo A4370-13, A4370-25, A4372-6a, A4374-21a, A4374-30a, A4374-7a, C5831-17, C5831-23, C5831-24, C5831-31; public domain.

May 11, 1967. 5;15 PM-5:25 PM. The American Helicopter Society presents LBJ and Lady Bird with an award in recognition of “your nearly 20 years of pioneering and regular utilization of helicopters for reliable, time-saving transportation in all parts of the world.” Of course, LBJ’s use of the helicopter in the 1948 campaign was especially innovative—and terrifying. 

Photos clockwise from top: Signing the Immigration Bill, 10/3/65 (C666-6A-WH65); ‘48 campaign (48-6-7-26); travelling in Malaysia, 10/30/66 (a3440-4); picking up the Humphreys at the Ranch, 11/9/64,  and the ‘48 campaign (48-6-7-18). 

September-October 1966. This White House-produced film documents the President’s activities for September and October of 1966. It contains lots of campaign footage for the upcoming midterm election, some of it no-holds-barred partisan rhetoric: 

"Afraid, afraid, afraid. Republicans are afraid of their own shadows and they are afraid of the shadow of progress. But the only thing that most Americans are afraid of are Republicans. And that is why the Americans have given us a Democratic Congress and that is why the Congress has given us more education bills, more health bills, more dollars to fight poverty, more dollars to rebuild cities, more dollars to help people with Medicare than any Congress in the history of this Nation."

—-President Johnson’s Remarks at the Verrazano Monument, Staten Island, New York, October 12, 1966

 

July 23, 1966. President and Lady Bird Johnson begin a busy day of stumping for Democrats in the upcoming election. They travel to Indiana, Kentucky, and Illinois. 


“We landed at Indianapolis, where, because the airport was under construction, there was not supposed to be any crowd. But thousands had gathered. Then we drove to downtown Indianapolis, where some forty-two thousand people filled a huge circle and poured out into the streets which radiated into it. In the middle stood a great dominating monument, at the base of which Lyndon spoke. A sea of faces, signs saying “WE LOVE LUCI,” “WE ARE BACKING YOU ON VIETNAM,” “WE HAVE A DAVE IN ‘68,” a wedding bell with “LUCI AND PAT” on it, and in the distance a sign, “VANCE SPEAKS FOR US.”


-Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, July 23, 1966. LBJ Presidential library photo A2841-25.

July 23, 1966. President and Lady Bird Johnson begin a busy day of stumping for Democrats in the upcoming election. They travel to Indiana, Kentucky, and Illinois. 

“We landed at Indianapolis, where, because the airport was under construction, there was not supposed to be any crowd. But thousands had gathered. Then we drove to downtown Indianapolis, where some forty-two thousand people filled a huge circle and poured out into the streets which radiated into it. In the middle stood a great dominating monument, at the base of which Lyndon spoke. A sea of faces, signs saying “WE LOVE LUCI,” “WE ARE BACKING YOU ON VIETNAM,” “WE HAVE A DAVE IN ‘68,” a wedding bell with “LUCI AND PAT” on it, and in the distance a sign, “VANCE SPEAKS FOR US.”

-Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, July 23, 1966. LBJ Presidential library photo A2841-25.

Mr. President, you know this is a campaign year and I’ll be getting out, speaking up for the Republicans. They’ll need all the voices they can get. But there won’t be anything personal in what I say about you in what I say about the Democratic Administration.

Former VP Richard Nixon, March 13, 1966, according to Lady Bird Johnson in A White House Diary. The two men had met that day in the White House and spoken informally about international affairs and Nixon’s recent trip to Europe. 

November, 1964. Despite his recent electoral victory, LBJ does not get a break from foreign crises: ongoing strife in the Congo results in a plan for US paratroopers to be involved in a rescue of hostages.

On November 23, he speaks with Dean Rusk, George Ball and Robert McNamara about developments, including LBJ’s decision on a proposed plan to rescue white hostages and possible repercussions among African American voters—who just turned out in large numbers to vote for LBJ. 

“The Jenkins story as it happened did not remain in the headlines for long. Within a few days after what had happened became public, the Chinese exploded their first nuclear bomb; the Tory government in England, which had been in power for thirteen years was voted out of office; and Nikita Khruschev was deposed.” 

—Merle Miller, Lyndon: An Oral Biography. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1980, p. 400.

October 26, 1964. RFK calls LBJ to talk about the coming election.  Despite his own and Lady Bird’s intense campaigning in the south, LBJ is worried about carrying the southern states, largely due to civil rights: tensions have built around issues like desegregation and the seating of the MFDP at the Democratic Convention. He discusses his recent trip to South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida with RFK, and Kennedy asks the President to bring his motorcade through Long Island on his upcoming visit to New York.  
Photo: Sit-in at Woolworth’s lunch counter: Tallahassee, Florida, 3/13/60. State Library and Archives of Florida via Flickr Commons. 

October 26, 1964. RFK calls LBJ to talk about the coming election.  Despite his own and Lady Bird’s intense campaigning in the south, LBJ is worried about carrying the southern states, largely due to civil rights: tensions have built around issues like desegregation and the seating of the MFDP at the Democratic Convention. He discusses his recent trip to South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida with RFK, and Kennedy asks the President to bring his motorcade through Long Island on his upcoming visit to New York.  

Photo: Sit-in at Woolworth’s lunch counter: Tallahassee, Florida, 3/13/60. State Library and Archives of Florida via Flickr Commons. 

July 27, 1960

LBJ spends the afternoon in Austin making plans to go to Hyannis Port to meet with JFK. He also meets with aide Horace Busby and Dr. Harry Ransom, asking Ransom to supply him with ideas and possibly get others at the University of Texas to do the same.


Meanwhile, Richard Nixon receives the Republican nomination for president; Henry Cabot Lodge is picked as his running mate the next day.

The Austin American-Statesman was two newspapers in 1941, even though they were part of the same company. The papers sent one or more photographers out with LBJ on the campaign trail, the first time his activities were documented for posterity by professionals.
Check out the abundance of detail in this photo: the makeshift AV set-up, the bagginess of LBJ’s suit, the second cameraman on the edge of the stage, and the assistant checking his watch.
LBJ Library photo 41-6-113, by the Austin American-Statesman. Use free with credit to the original source. 
On the history of the Austin American-Stateman: http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/eea11

The Austin American-Statesman was two newspapers in 1941, even though they were part of the same company. The papers sent one or more photographers out with LBJ on the campaign trail, the first time his activities were documented for posterity by professionals.

Check out the abundance of detail in this photo: the makeshift AV set-up, the bagginess of LBJ’s suit, the second cameraman on the edge of the stage, and the assistant checking his watch.

LBJ Library photo 41-6-113, by the Austin American-Statesman. Use free with credit to the original source. 

On the history of the Austin American-Stateman: http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/eea11

We hope you’ve been enjoying the terrific photos of the 1941 campaign donated to us by the Austin American-Statesman.

The photographs are even more impressive when you think of how much larger and heavier the cameras used by photojournalists in the 1940s were than today’s digital models. These 1941 photographs were made with cameras that used 4” x 5” sheet film.

The photographer had to put a loaded film holder into the camera, remove the “dark-slide,” take the photo, and then replace the slide in the film holder for each individual photograph that was made.  All of the camera settings (shutter speed, focus, lens aperture, etc.) were done manually.

The Graflex Speed Camera, below, was the workhorse of news photographers throughout the 1930s & 40s.

More on the Graflex Speed Graphic: http://graflex.org/speed-graphic/