Oct. 20, 1967. Lady Bird records in her Diary:

"Lyndon said, as he often has, that he would give a piece of his life if Speaker Sam Rayburn would be back with the gavel and he (Lyndon himself) were over in the Senate for just one week. In discussing President Eisenhower, he said: ‘He has paid me back one hundred percent for what I did for him when I was Majority Leader by just trying to be decent.’”

—Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 643. Photos: Ike and LBJ in 1955 and LBJ and Rayburn in 1956. 
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Oct. 20, 1967. Lady Bird records in her Diary:

"Lyndon said, as he often has, that he would give a piece of his life if Speaker Sam Rayburn would be back with the gavel and he (Lyndon himself) were over in the Senate for just one week. In discussing President Eisenhower, he said: ‘He has paid me back one hundred percent for what I did for him when I was Majority Leader by just trying to be decent.’”

—Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 643. Photos: Ike and LBJ in 1955 and LBJ and Rayburn in 1956

Sept. 28, 1967. 1:15 PM. LBJ and Lady Bird head to Texas, with Yuki leading the way!
LBJ Library photo #A4872-6, public domain. 

Sept. 28, 1967. 1:15 PM. LBJ and Lady Bird head to Texas, with Yuki leading the way!

LBJ Library photo #A4872-6, public domain. 

Sept. 22, 1967. LBJ and assistant Marvin Watson. 
LBJ Library photo #A4821-10, public domain. 

Sept. 22, 1967. LBJ and assistant Marvin Watson. 

LBJ Library photo #A4821-10, public domain. 

September 12, 1967. Lady Bird hosts a Country Fair at the White House for the children and grandchildren of Members of Congress, Cabinet Members, and government officials. The Fair included cotton candy, hot dogs, pony rides, a carousel, a fortune-teller, and carnival games with prizes. 
LBJ Presidential Library photo C5639-22; image is in the public domain.

September 12, 1967. Lady Bird hosts a Country Fair at the White House for the children and grandchildren of Members of Congress, Cabinet Members, and government officials. The Fair included cotton candy, hot dogs, pony rides, a carousel, a fortune-teller, and carnival games with prizes.

LBJ Presidential Library photo C5639-22; image is in the public domain.

August 22, 1967. His Imperial Majesty, Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, Shahanshah of Iran, arrives for a State Visit. LBJ and the Shah exchange remarks in the arrival ceremony. According to Lady Bird: 

“Lyndon, in his speech of welcome, spoke of our several meetings with the Shah and of Iran’s economy which has been growing at about 10 percent a year and its gains against illiteracy: ‘You are winning progress without violence and without any bloodshed—a lesson that others have still to learn.’ Then the Shah, speaking without notes, in perfect English but rather hesitantly, made a brief, earnest talk, disarming in its simplicity and its complete difference from the trite lines that are often read in a monotone voice at an arrival ceremony.”

After dinner that night, the Johnsons and their guests watched The American Ballet Theater perform “Rodeo,” featuring “cowgirls and square dancers….delightfully incongruous under the East Room chandeliers.”
—Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 616-8.

August 22, 1967. His Imperial Majesty, Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, Shahanshah of Iran, arrives for a State Visit. LBJ and the Shah exchange remarks in the arrival ceremony. According to Lady Bird: 

“Lyndon, in his speech of welcome, spoke of our several meetings with the Shah and of Iran’s economy which has been growing at about 10 percent a year and its gains against illiteracy: ‘You are winning progress without violence and without any bloodshed—a lesson that others have still to learn.’ Then the Shah, speaking without notes, in perfect English but rather hesitantly, made a brief, earnest talk, disarming in its simplicity and its complete difference from the trite lines that are often read in a monotone voice at an arrival ceremony.”

After dinner that night, the Johnsons and their guests watched The American Ballet Theater perform “Rodeo,” featuring “cowgirls and square dancers….delightfully incongruous under the East Room chandeliers.”

—Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 616-8.

August 3, 1967. LBJ’s frequent companion, Yuki the dog, accompanies him on his walk around the grounds with the press.
LBJ Library photo A4554-23, public domain. L-R: George Christian, President Lyndon B. Johnson, Yuki, Hon. Cyrus Vance, Lt. Gen. John Throckmorton. 

August 3, 1967. LBJ’s frequent companion, Yuki the dog, accompanies him on his walk around the grounds with the press.

LBJ Library photo A4554-23, public domain. L-R: George Christian, President Lyndon B. Johnson, Yuki, Hon. Cyrus Vance, Lt. Gen. John Throckmorton. 

August 2, 1967. A doting grandma (Lady Bird) pushes her grandchild (Lyn Nugent) in front of the White House. As peaceful as this image is, Lady Bird was never far from constant concerns of her family’s public position: 

“They [Luci and Pat Nugent] will go to the Bahamas sometime this week, just when I don’t really want to know. I understand Luci’s reasoning for not wanting to give out this information. In the climate of the day, with bitterness and riots, as carefree a little soul as she is, she does not want to advertise the time when both she and Pat will be on a plane.”

Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 606.  Photo c6157-6a, public domain. 

August 2, 1967. A doting grandma (Lady Bird) pushes her grandchild (Lyn Nugent) in front of the White House. As peaceful as this image is, Lady Bird was never far from constant concerns of her family’s public position: 

“They [Luci and Pat Nugent] will go to the Bahamas sometime this week, just when I don’t really want to know. I understand Luci’s reasoning for not wanting to give out this information. In the climate of the day, with bitterness and riots, as carefree a little soul as she is, she does not want to advertise the time when both she and Pat will be on a plane.”

Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 606.  Photo c6157-6a, public domain. 

July 18, 1967. Lady Bird and LBJ accompany Icelandic President Asgeir Asgeirsson to the State Dinner in his honor. 
LBJ Library photo # C6036-31, public domain. 

July 18, 1967. Lady Bird and LBJ accompany Icelandic President Asgeir Asgeirsson to the State Dinner in his honor. 

LBJ Library photo # C6036-31, public domain. 

June 25, 1967. The Glassboro summit is over: Kosygin departs, and LBJ heads to Philadelphia and from there back to the White House—with great haste. As per the Daily Diary:

“Take-off from Philadelphia for Washington, D.C.—This flight was to be speeded up as much as possible for the President was in a race w/ time, for he wanted to make his statement on live television at the White House prior to Chairman Kosygin’s televised Press Conference in New York…
"AF One 26000 landed at Washington National Airport, the MAC terminal. The President and the occupants of his helicopter quickly lined up at the back door of the plane so that they could go directly to the waiting helicopter with a minimum of time.  However, as the door opened, it was discovered that the steps had been placed, by mistake, at the front of the plane, so as the President and party raced through the plane, it could be heard over the intercom, ‘Make way for the President.’  As Frank Cormier who was in the press pool on board the plane, [noted] it looked almost like one of the old silent movies in which a comedy of errors occurred.”

Photo: LBJ finally makes his speech, with Lynda behind him and the White House dogs off to the right. #C5791-6A. LBJ Presidential Library. 

June 25, 1967. The Glassboro summit is over: Kosygin departs, and LBJ heads to Philadelphia and from there back to the White House—with great haste. As per the Daily Diary:

“Take-off from Philadelphia for Washington, D.C.—This flight was to be speeded up as much as possible for the President was in a race w/ time, for he wanted to make his statement on live television at the White House prior to Chairman Kosygin’s televised Press Conference in New York…

"AF One 26000 landed at Washington National Airport, the MAC terminal. The President and the occupants of his helicopter quickly lined up at the back door of the plane so that they could go directly to the waiting helicopter with a minimum of time.  However, as the door opened, it was discovered that the steps had been placed, by mistake, at the front of the plane, so as the President and party raced through the plane, it could be heard over the intercom, ‘Make way for the President.’  As Frank Cormier who was in the press pool on board the plane, [noted] it looked almost like one of the old silent movies in which a comedy of errors occurred.”

Photo: LBJ finally makes his speech, with Lynda behind him and the White House dogs off to the right. #C5791-6A. LBJ Presidential Library. 

June 13, 1967. LBJ is at the news ticker (again), while aide Marvin Watson is on the telephone. 
LBJ Presidential Library #A4274-11a, public domain. 

June 13, 1967. LBJ is at the news ticker (again), while aide Marvin Watson is on the telephone. 

LBJ Presidential Library #A4274-11a, public domain. 

June 13, 1967. LBJ nominates Thurgood Marshall as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court in a ceremony in the Rose Garden (audio here—listen for the birds and sirens in the distance!). LBJ and Solicitor General Marshall then accompany the press inside for the President’s news conference. LBJ fields questions on the resolution of the Six-Day War and the importance of the hot line, the attack on the USS Liberty, Vietnam, and growing violence in the cities—which is about to get much, much, worse.  
LBJ Presidential Library #A4275-11, public domain. 

June 13, 1967. LBJ nominates Thurgood Marshall as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court in a ceremony in the Rose Garden (audio here—listen for the birds and sirens in the distance!). LBJ and Solicitor General Marshall then accompany the press inside for the President’s news conference. LBJ fields questions on the resolution of the Six-Day War and the importance of the hot linethe attack on the USS LibertyVietnam, and growing violence in the cities—which is about to get much, much, worse.  

LBJ Presidential Library #A4275-11, public domain. 

June 9, 1967. White House photographer Yoichi Okamoto takes this great candid shot of LBJ and Marvin Watson. 
LBJ Presidential Library #A4261-17, public domain. 

June 9, 1967. White House photographer Yoichi Okamoto takes this great candid shot of LBJ and Marvin Watson. 

LBJ Presidential Library #A4261-17, public domain. 

June 5, 1967. Lady Bird records some of the thoughts about the chaotic day in her daily audio diary:

“Not since that day in October 1962 (during the Cuban missile crisis) had I felt so tense and strained, known such a feeling of foreboding…I remember that other day, when I stood in the bedroom at The Elms—a beautiful, clear, golden day—and looked out at the sunlight shimmering on the leaves of golds and crimsons and reds and wondered: ‘Is this the last beautiful October day we shall see?’ But there is nothing I can do about the great clash of powers—nothing at all, except be quiet and sympathetic and cheerful when Lyndon is home…

In this place there are thermometers of trouble somewhere in the world…the presence of TV vans by the West Wing is always one, and in the space outside the press lobby a commentator with a mike standing in the spotlight’s glare. Another is the sudden arrival of a fleet of limousines, some bringing Congressional leadership, and some Chiefs of Staff, to Lyndon’s office.

It was a little after 10 when Lyndon came home to dinner. He looked burdened and the lines in his face deeper, and I felt it would be the greatest cruelty for me to ask him to talk about the war in the Middle East. I tried some brisk, bright reports on what I had been doing today, and they sounded hollow.”

—Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, page 520-522 Photos LBJ Presidential Library 5608-8a, 5608-2a, 5608-3a, and 5608-14a; public domain.

June 3, 1967. LBJ watches his three television sets in the Oval Office. According to various sources (like this one and this one), LBJ’s three TVs  inspired Elvis Presley to have the same at Graceland. 
Photo C5602-28, LBJ Presidential Library, public domain. 

June 3, 1967. LBJ watches his three television sets in the Oval Office. According to various sources (like this one and this one), LBJ’s three TVs  inspired Elvis Presley to have the same at Graceland. 

Photo C5602-28, LBJ Presidential Library, public domain.