January 27, 1967. A reporter learns that there is, well, no story to speak of about the creation of the LBJ Presidential Library. From the Daily Diary: 

"Andrew Glass of the Washington Post came into talk to the President about the Johnson library at Austin. He is doing a story for the Washington Post on the Johnson library, obviously inspired by the recent controversy in the Post over the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. 
"Glass had been to Austin for four days talking to University officials and others concerned with the Johnson library. He asked the President whether any other sites had been considered for the library, and the President replied that consideration was given to a number of others, including Baylor, Johnson City, San Marcos, Syracuse University, and the Library of Congress. 
"The President described the reasons for the ultimate selection of Austin—the University of Texas provided important collateral sources for scholarly use and that as Mrs. Johnson’s and Lynda’s alma mater it had strong personal claim on the affections of the Johnsons. The President said the importance of the library to him was principally that it would house papers going back 35 years and encompassing many of the important public events of our times. Glass told the President that he had found—to his surprise—that there was no controversy over the library, no bad feelings or suspicion of any kind, and that he intended to write a story that would be favorable in tone.”

LBJ Presidential Library photo #d1773-3a, public domain. 

January 27, 1967. A reporter learns that there is, well, no story to speak of about the creation of the LBJ Presidential Library. From the Daily Diary

"Andrew Glass of the Washington Post came into talk to the President about the Johnson library at Austin. He is doing a story for the Washington Post on the Johnson library, obviously inspired by the recent controversy in the Post over the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. 

"Glass had been to Austin for four days talking to University officials and others concerned with the Johnson library. He asked the President whether any other sites had been considered for the library, and the President replied that consideration was given to a number of others, including Baylor, Johnson City, San Marcos, Syracuse University, and the Library of Congress. 

"The President described the reasons for the ultimate selection of Austin—the University of Texas provided important collateral sources for scholarly use and that as Mrs. Johnson’s and Lynda’s alma mater it had strong personal claim on the affections of the Johnsons. The President said the importance of the library to him was principally that it would house papers going back 35 years and encompassing many of the important public events of our times. Glass told the President that he had found—to his surprise—that there was no controversy over the library, no bad feelings or suspicion of any kind, and that he intended to write a story that would be favorable in tone.”

LBJ Presidential Library photo #d1773-3a, public domain. 

September 21, 1966. LBJ has a two-hour, off-the-record meeting with staff from the Washington Post. Left to right: Ben Bradlee, Russell Wiggins, Katharine (Kay) Graham, President Lyndon B. Johnson. 
LBJ was an old friend of the Grahams: you can listen to an excerpt of a telephone conversation with Kay from December 2, 1963, a few months after she took over the Post upon her husband’s death. 
LBJ Presidential Library photo A3178-13. Public domain.

September 21, 1966. LBJ has a two-hour, off-the-record meeting with staff from the Washington Post. Left to right: Ben Bradlee, Russell Wiggins, Katharine (Kay) Graham, President Lyndon B. Johnson. 

LBJ was an old friend of the Grahams: you can listen to an excerpt of a telephone conversation with Kay from December 2, 1963, a few months after she took over the Post upon her husband’s death. 

LBJ Presidential Library photo A3178-13. Public domain.

December 2, 1963: LBJ calls Washington Post publisher Katharine Graham to persuade her to run a story that will bring pressure on Congress to pass the Civil Rights Bill as soon as possible.

LBJ:  “So I’d like for them to be asking these fellows, ‘Where did you spend your Thanksgiving holidays?  Tell me about it.  Was it warm and nice?’  And write a little story on it.”  [Graham chuckles.] “Because we were here punching and we’re going to have to do it now.  If you don’t, they’re going to start quitting here about the 18th of December, and they’ll come back about the 18th of January.  Then they’ll have hearings [on the Civil Rights Bill] in the [House] Rules Committee ‘til about the middle of March.  And then they’ll pass the bill and it will get over [to the Senate], and Dick Russell will say it’s Easter and Lincoln’s Birthday, and by the time they get them, he will screw them to death, because he is so much smarter than they are.”

(Source: youtube.com)