September 24, 1964. The Warren Commission Report is presented to LBJ. It will be released to the public three days later. You can read it all online here. 
Photo: L-R: John McCloy, J. Lee Rankin (General Counsel), Senator Richard Russell, Representative Gerald Ford, Chief Justice Earl Warren, President Lyndon B. Johnson, Allen Dulles, Senator John Sherman Cooper, and Representative Hale Boggs, the Cabinet Room. LBJ Library photo C732-1-WH64, public domain.

September 24, 1964. The Warren Commission Report is presented to LBJ. It will be released to the public three days later. You can read it all online here

Photo: L-R: John McCloy, J. Lee Rankin (General Counsel), Senator Richard Russell, Representative Gerald Ford, Chief Justice Earl Warren, President Lyndon B. Johnson, Allen Dulles, Senator John Sherman Cooper, and Representative Hale Boggs, the Cabinet Room. LBJ Library photo C732-1-WH64, public domain.

November 1963. U. Alexis Johnson, Deputy Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs, sends this summary of what is known about Lee Harvey Oswald and his activities to the White House. These documents were declassified in the 1990s.

LBJ Library, National Security File, Intelligence File, “Oswald, Lee Harvey,” Doc. # 35, 35a, and 35b.

Saturday, November 23, 1963. Dallas.

Dallas Police Chief Curry orders the transfer of Lee Harvey Oswald to the county jail. The transfer is planned for Sunday morning, November 24.

The Warren Commission report (available here) includes Chief Curry’s statement on the decision:


    “Then, I talked to [Captain] Fritz about when he thought he would transfer the prisoner, and he didn’t think it was a good idea to transfer him at night because of the fact you couldn’t see, and if anybody tried to cause them any trouble, they needed to see who they were and where it was coming from and so forth, and he suggested that we wait until daylight, so this was normal procedure, I mean, for Fritz to determine when he is going to transfer his prisoners, so I told him ‘Okay.’ I asked him, I said, ‘What time do you think you will be ready tomorrow?’ And he didn’t know exactly and I said, ‘Do you think about 10 o’clock,’ and he said, ‘I believe so,’ and then is when I went out and told the newspaper people … ‘I believe if you are back here by 10 o’clock you will be back in time to observe anything you care to observe.’”