December 16, 1966. Lady Bird records in her diary:

“Yesterday came the announcement of Bill Moyers’ departure. The Manchester book and the ugly stories about it are dominating the newspapers. Mrs. Kennedy is filing suit to block publication of the book.. The ‘credibility gap’ (that coined phrase) is rapidly gaining acceptance through repetition, and the critical Democratic Governors’ opinions are filling the papers. Nevertheless, life goes on and so does Christmas.”

Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 509.

December 13, 1966. 12:45 PM. According to the President’s Daily Diary: in between meetings with the National Security Council and former Australian Prime Minister Sir Robert Menzies, LBJ pauses to announce to all in earshot that Luci’s dog Freckles has had four puppies. 
The Johnsons are unquestionably dog lovers, as this April 1966 photo in the White House Flower Garden attests. In this picture Mrs. Johnson is holding Freckles; LBJ has Kim; Luci holds Him, and Pat Nugent is paired with Blanco. Him is the sire of Kim and Freckles, who were born in October of 1965. Sadly, Him was killed about two months after this photo was taken, hit by a car on the White House driveway. Him’s other half, Her, had died after eating a rock in December 1964. 
Technically, Kim and Freckles are Luci’s dogs, although after her marriage to Pat Nugent Freckles remained at the White House. With the birth of Freckles’s puppies, a new generation of Johnson beagles is born.
LBJ Presidential Library photo #C1747-18, public domain. 

December 13, 1966. 12:45 PM. According to the President’s Daily Diary: in between meetings with the National Security Council and former Australian Prime Minister Sir Robert Menzies, LBJ pauses to announce to all in earshot that Luci’s dog Freckles has had four puppies. 

The Johnsons are unquestionably dog lovers, as this April 1966 photo in the White House Flower Garden attests. In this picture Mrs. Johnson is holding Freckles; LBJ has Kim; Luci holds Him, and Pat Nugent is paired with Blanco. Him is the sire of Kim and Freckles, who were born in October of 1965. Sadly, Him was killed about two months after this photo was taken, hit by a car on the White House driveway. Him’s other half, Her, had died after eating a rock in December 1964. 

Technically, Kim and Freckles are Luci’s dogs, although after her marriage to Pat Nugent Freckles remained at the White House. With the birth of Freckles’s puppies, a new generation of Johnson beagles is born.

LBJ Presidential Library photo #C1747-18, public domain. 

November 7, 1966. President Johnson (back to camera at right) speaks with Lady Bird and their friend Mathilde Krim, as they travel from the Krim Ranch to LBJ Ranch. The Johnsons are in Texas for LBJ’s speech on education at Cotulla and to cast their votes tomorrow, in the midterm elections. 

November 7, 1966. President Johnson (back to camera at right) speaks with Lady Bird and their friend Mathilde Krim, as they travel from the Krim Ranch to LBJ Ranch. The Johnsons are in Texas for LBJ’s speech on education at Cotulla and to cast their votes tomorrow, in the midterm elections. 

September 21, 1966. Lady Bird visits California and makes a speech in Monterey:


“I wanted not only to see the natural beauty of your country but also to salute the citizens and leaders in government who have taken action to preserve this natural heritage. Your coastline, which is your immediate pride and pleasure, is also the nation’s coastline, our common western edge. What you have done with it makes all your countrymen applaud. We have misused our resources, but we haven’t destroyed them. It is late. It is fortunately not too late, and I know that the people of Monterey Peninsula know that conservation, beautification, call it what you will, is more than just one tree, or one historic building, or one scenic highway. It is a frame of reference, a way of life.”


-Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pages 465-466. Photo: Lady Bird at the Pacific Coast Highway. LBJ Presidential Library #C3188-27a.

September 21, 1966. Lady Bird visits California and makes a speech in Monterey:

“I wanted not only to see the natural beauty of your country but also to salute the citizens and leaders in government who have taken action to preserve this natural heritage. Your coastline, which is your immediate pride and pleasure, is also the nation’s coastline, our common western edge. What you have done with it makes all your countrymen applaud. We have misused our resources, but we haven’t destroyed them. It is late. It is fortunately not too late, and I know that the people of Monterey Peninsula know that conservation, beautification, call it what you will, is more than just one tree, or one historic building, or one scenic highway. It is a frame of reference, a way of life.”

-Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pages 465-466. Photo: Lady Bird at the Pacific Coast Highway. LBJ Presidential Library #C3188-27a.

We drove to the Montgomery County Fair grounds where there was a huge, good-natured crowd everywhere…Lyndon spoke on youth and the need for all young people to enter their public service for some period in their lives. Suddenly in front of us, out of the sea of humanity, a banner went up: “”THOU SHALT NOT KILL.” We could see scuffling around a small group, with the police moving in and linking their arms around them.

September 5, 1966. Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 461.

August 2, 1966. Lady Bird asks Juanita Roberts, LBJ’s personal secretary, to take notes at Luci’s wedding for the future LBJ Presidential Library.
Photo: Juanita Roberts in 1964. LBJ Presidential Library # W393-3. public domain. 

August 2, 1966. Lady Bird asks Juanita Roberts, LBJ’s personal secretary, to take notes at Luci’s wedding for the future LBJ Presidential Library.

Photo: Juanita Roberts in 1964. LBJ Presidential Library # W393-3. public domain. 

July 20, 1966. In her diary, Lady Bird records a discussion of some of the arrangements for Luci’s wedding to Pat Nugent, which is to happen on August 6. Among the issues are how to find parking near the White House for 700 guests; whether a peace organization will stage a protest in Lafayette Park or accept the National Park Service’s suggestion that they move; and whether the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee will demonstrate near the church, as SNCC’s leader Stokely Carmichael has indicated. 
Above: one route from the wedding (Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception) to the reception (the White House). 

July 20, 1966. In her diary, Lady Bird records a discussion of some of the arrangements for Luci’s wedding to Pat Nugent, which is to happen on August 6. Among the issues are how to find parking near the White House for 700 guests; whether a peace organization will stage a protest in Lafayette Park or accept the National Park Service’s suggestion that they move; and whether the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee will demonstrate near the church, as SNCC’s leader Stokely Carmichael has indicated. 

Above: one route from the wedding (Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception) to the reception (the White House)

July 20, 1966. Lady Bird’s diary:


"Lyndon woke about 5. Neither of us could go back to sleep so we talked—about each of the children and their various problems, about all the troubles that beset Lyndon and his future, about me and the things I want to do, both between now and the time we leave this house and then for years afterward. Home and husband, grandchildren, wildflowers, travel, running rivers, hunting for pictographs, and covered bridges and outdoor summer pageants. There is so much I want to do."


Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 434. LBJ Library photo D914-22, from 7/5/68. 

July 20, 1966. Lady Bird’s diary:

"Lyndon woke about 5. Neither of us could go back to sleep so we talked—about each of the children and their various problems, about all the troubles that beset Lyndon and his future, about me and the things I want to do, both between now and the time we leave this house and then for years afterward. Home and husband, grandchildren, wildflowers, travel, running rivers, hunting for pictographs, and covered bridges and outdoor summer pageants. There is so much I want to do."

Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 434. LBJ Library photo D914-22, from 7/5/68. 

May 12, 1966. Lady Bird, President Johnson, Max Brooks, W.W. Heath, and Bill Moyers, among others, meet with architect Gordon Bunshaft to see his concept model for the future Presidential Library which will be built on the UT Austin campus.

 In his oral history, Bunshaft describes the presentation:

Bunshaft: The President walked in and he said, “Mr. Bunshaft, I only have five minutes.”  God, I ran him back and forth between these two things, and he stayed about fifteen minutes.  I didn’t ever figure out how he could understand what I was talking about.  This is a complex building, if you see it, especially on drawings.  I ran him back and forth.  That was a Friday.  He didn’t say a word [about] whether he liked it or not.  He left and Mrs. Johnson said, “Well, we’ll have to do a lot of thinking and talking about this.”  Then that was the end of it.  Monday the President called up Heath in Texas and said, “I approve the design.”

Mulhollan: From a lengthy fifteen minute briefing.

B: Yes.  That floored everybody, because we assumed it would take at least a month. […] Frank [Stanton] had thought that the President might talk of this.  He didn’t know about the approval.  In fact, I didn’t either Tuesday.  And [Johnson] described the building to his wife.  After dinner, President Johnson described every damned detail of this building to Mrs. Stanton.

M: And got it right.

B: Got the whole damned thing.  Now, how the hell he could have understood it and remembered it from fifteen minutes is beyond me.  In fact, the next meeting I had, I talked to one of the secretaries, Juanita Roberts, and I said, “Look, he must have come back and studied that model.”  The model was taken away the next morning, but he could have come back that evening.  She’s very close, not his secretary, she’s an assistant; she’s not out there, but she’s in Washington—anyhow, swore up and down that the President never went back.

— Transcript, Gordon Bunshaft Oral History Interview I, 6/25/69, by Paige E. Mulhollan, Electronic Copy, LBJ Library. 

April 26, 1966. Lady Bird shows two young people some blooming white azaleas. She later wrote of this and other urban beautification efforts: 

"Green oases and neighborhood parks within cities offer a promise. If people in humdrum jobs, in drab buildings, surrounded by noise and confusion, know they can move out of all that into areas of serene beauty and quiet, even for a brief time each day, they can better cope with conditions that may bring them to the breaking point."

LBJ Library photograph C1754-25. Lady Bird Johnson quote from Lady Bird Johnson and Carlton B. Lees, Wildflowers Across America, New York: Abbevile Press, 1993, p. 264.

April 26, 1966. Lady Bird shows two young people some blooming white azaleas. She later wrote of this and other urban beautification efforts: 

"Green oases and neighborhood parks within cities offer a promise. If people in humdrum jobs, in drab buildings, surrounded by noise and confusion, know they can move out of all that into areas of serene beauty and quiet, even for a brief time each day, they can better cope with conditions that may bring them to the breaking point."

LBJ Library photograph C1754-25. Lady Bird Johnson quote from Lady Bird Johnson and Carlton B. Lees, Wildflowers Across America, New York: Abbevile Press, 1993, p. 264.

April 22, 1966. Lady Bird records in her diary a story from a female visitor to the White House. The visitor was unable to get close enough to the President to kiss him, so she kissed one of his beagles instead. History does not record the beagle’s reaction. 
LBJ Library photo W216-6, public domain.  

April 22, 1966. Lady Bird records in her diary a story from a female visitor to the White House. The visitor was unable to get close enough to the President to kiss him, so she kissed one of his beagles instead. History does not record the beagle’s reaction.

LBJ Library photo W216-6, public domain.  

April 14, 1966. Crowds await the Johnsons’ arrival at the Mexico City D. F. International Airport. 
LBJ Library photo A2257-15, public domain. 

April 14, 1966. Crowds await the Johnsons’ arrival at the Mexico City D. F. International Airport. 

LBJ Library photo A2257-15, public domain.