Oct. 20, 1967. Lady Bird records in her Diary:

"Lyndon said, as he often has, that he would give a piece of his life if Speaker Sam Rayburn would be back with the gavel and he (Lyndon himself) were over in the Senate for just one week. In discussing President Eisenhower, he said: ‘He has paid me back one hundred percent for what I did for him when I was Majority Leader by just trying to be decent.’”

—Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 643. Photos: Ike and LBJ in 1955 and LBJ and Rayburn in 1956. 
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Oct. 20, 1967. Lady Bird records in her Diary:

"Lyndon said, as he often has, that he would give a piece of his life if Speaker Sam Rayburn would be back with the gavel and he (Lyndon himself) were over in the Senate for just one week. In discussing President Eisenhower, he said: ‘He has paid me back one hundred percent for what I did for him when I was Majority Leader by just trying to be decent.’”

—Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 643. Photos: Ike and LBJ in 1955 and LBJ and Rayburn in 1956

October 20, 1967. Lady Bird has a candid conversation with LBJ’s physician, Dr. James Cain, about his health and their future:

"I told him my feelings—that I did not want to go through the grueling six months of a campaign, and that even more, if we should win I did not want to face another four years as devouring as these last four have been….There are so many things I want to do! My list is a mile long. And for the first time in my life I believe that Lyndon, too, could be happy….
"I asked Jim frankly, as a medical man, what advice he could give me. He said, ‘Obviously he has aged. The last four years have taken a lot out of him, But I cannot say, as I think the doctors should have said to FDR when he ran for his fourth term, that he won’t live out this next term….’ 
"And so the dilemma continues.”

—Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 643. Photo:A1798-34, 1/24/1966.

October 20, 1967. Lady Bird has a candid conversation with LBJ’s physician, Dr. James Cain, about his health and their future:

"I told him my feelings—that I did not want to go through the grueling six months of a campaign, and that even more, if we should win I did not want to face another four years as devouring as these last four have been….There are so many things I want to do! My list is a mile long. And for the first time in my life I believe that Lyndon, too, could be happy….

"I asked Jim frankly, as a medical man, what advice he could give me. He said, ‘Obviously he has aged. The last four years have taken a lot out of him, But I cannot say, as I think the doctors should have said to FDR when he ran for his fourth term, that he won’t live out this next term….’

"And so the dilemma continues.”

—Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 643. Photo:A1798-34, 1/24/1966.

September 30, 1967.

"We were due to have a family picture made at 11 A.M. today—an event I always approach as an ordeal because it falls to my lot to try to get everybody in the humor…
"We took our seats on the orange sofa in the den….Patrick Lyndon screwed up his face and let out a yell. Everybody went into gyrations trying to amuse him. Luci went for a bottle of milk, and then there followed one of the most hilarious scenes of my lifetime. Lyndon gave Okie instructions on how to shoot the picture, then he stuck the bottle of milk in Lyn’s mouth for a long suck, snatched it out and put it quickly behind my back while we all composed our faces into hopefully appropriate expressions and Okie snapped. This went on time after time, with little Lyn getting madder and madder, hollering louder and louder, and I melting into laughter between snaps until the tears rolled down my cheeks…. And Lyndon looked like the frustrated captain who can’t make his team play right.”

 Lady Bird Johnson  A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 571-572. LBJ Presidential Library contact sheet 1967-09-30-C6787, public domain.

September 30, 1967.

"We were due to have a family picture made at 11 A.M. today—an event I always approach as an ordeal because it falls to my lot to try to get everybody in the humor…

"We took our seats on the orange sofa in the den….Patrick Lyndon screwed up his face and let out a yell. Everybody went into gyrations trying to amuse him. Luci went for a bottle of milk, and then there followed one of the most hilarious scenes of my lifetime. Lyndon gave Okie instructions on how to shoot the picture, then he stuck the bottle of milk in Lyn’s mouth for a long suck, snatched it out and put it quickly behind my back while we all composed our faces into hopefully appropriate expressions and Okie snapped. This went on time after time, with little Lyn getting madder and madder, hollering louder and louder, and I melting into laughter between snaps until the tears rolled down my cheeks…. And Lyndon looked like the frustrated captain who can’t make his team play right.”

 Lady Bird Johnson  A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 571-572. LBJ Presidential Library contact sheet 1967-09-30-C6787, public domain.

Sept. 28, 1967. 1:15 PM. LBJ and Lady Bird head to Texas, with Yuki leading the way!
LBJ Library photo #A4872-6, public domain. 

Sept. 28, 1967. 1:15 PM. LBJ and Lady Bird head to Texas, with Yuki leading the way!

LBJ Library photo #A4872-6, public domain. 

Sept. 26, 1967. Lady Bird greets Aissa Diori, wife of Niger President Hamani Diori, on their State visit to the White House. President Diori has been in power since 1960: he will be deposed in 1974, seven years after this photo was taken. According to this article in the U.S. paper The Times-News, Mrs. Diori will die in the coup.  
LBJ Library photo C6729-12, public domain. The man between Lady Bird and Aissa Diori is Under Secretary of State Nicholas Katzenbach. 

Sept. 26, 1967. Lady Bird greets Aissa Diori, wife of Niger President Hamani Diori, on their State visit to the White House. President Diori has been in power since 1960: he will be deposed in 1974, seven years after this photo was taken. According to this article in the U.S. paper The Times-News, Mrs. Diori will die in the coup.  

LBJ Library photo C6729-12, public domain. The man between Lady Bird and Aissa Diori is Under Secretary of State Nicholas Katzenbach. 

Monday, Sept. 25, 1967. Last night was one of those bleak nights when the shadows take over. We both woke up about 3:30 AM and talked and talked and talked about when and how to make the statement that Lyndon is not going to be a candidate again.

Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 627.

September 20, 1967. Lady Bird stops in Montevideo, Minnesota on her four-day Crossroads USA tour. She visits South Dakota, Minnesota, Michigan, Missouri, Indiana, Wisconsin, and Illinois. Watch a video of highlights from her trip here. 

September 20, 1967. Lady Bird stops in Montevideo, Minnesota on her four-day Crossroads USA tour. She visits South Dakota, Minnesota, Michigan, Missouri, Indiana, Wisconsin, and Illinois. Watch a video of highlights from her trip here

September 12, 1967. Lady Bird hosts a Country Fair at the White House for the children and grandchildren of Members of Congress, Cabinet Members, and government officials. The Fair included cotton candy, hot dogs, pony rides, a carousel, a fortune-teller, and carnival games with prizes. 
LBJ Presidential Library photo C5639-22; image is in the public domain.

September 12, 1967. Lady Bird hosts a Country Fair at the White House for the children and grandchildren of Members of Congress, Cabinet Members, and government officials. The Fair included cotton candy, hot dogs, pony rides, a carousel, a fortune-teller, and carnival games with prizes.

LBJ Presidential Library photo C5639-22; image is in the public domain.

August 26, 1967. 
1 PM. Lady Bird leaves Kerrville, TX, where she has attended the dedication of the Butt-Holdsworth Library. 
1:30 PM. Lunch at the Ranch. Work with decorators. 
10 PM. Leave Austin for Washington, DC, with stopover in Dallas. 
3:30 AM. Land at Friendship Airport (now BWI). Travel to Mt. Vernon, then ferry to the yacht Sequoia, anchored on the Potomac. 
4:30 AM. “And with a few muffled word of greeting, I sank wearily into bed. It was 4:30 AM, and it was the morning of Lyndon’s fifty-ninth birthday.”
-A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 620-621. Photo via Boy Scouts of America, York-Adams Area Council,

August 26, 1967. 

  • 1 PM. Lady Bird leaves Kerrville, TX, where she has attended the dedication of the Butt-Holdsworth Library. 
  • 1:30 PM. Lunch at the Ranch. Work with decorators. 
  • 10 PM. Leave Austin for Washington, DC, with stopover in Dallas. 
  • 4:30 AM. “And with a few muffled word of greeting, I sank wearily into bed. It was 4:30 AM, and it was the morning of Lyndon’s fifty-ninth birthday.”

-A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 620-621. Photo via Boy Scouts of America, York-Adams Area Council,

It’s strange. You feel soothed and happy by the companionship of your daughter and your son-in-law, and the fine young people who are their friends and the members of your staff. And the cool, brisk, shiny beauty of the day. But simultaneously, you are way down and grieved, emotionally wearied by the troubles that you must try to solve—the growing virus of the riots, the rising list of Vietnam casualties, criticism from your own friends, or former friends, in Congress—and most of the complaining is coming from the Democrats.

August 13, 1967. Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 611.

August 2, 1967. A doting grandma (Lady Bird) pushes her grandchild (Lyn Nugent) in front of the White House. As peaceful as this image is, Lady Bird was never far from constant concerns of her family’s public position: 

“They [Luci and Pat Nugent] will go to the Bahamas sometime this week, just when I don’t really want to know. I understand Luci’s reasoning for not wanting to give out this information. In the climate of the day, with bitterness and riots, as carefree a little soul as she is, she does not want to advertise the time when both she and Pat will be on a plane.”

Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 606.  Photo c6157-6a, public domain. 

August 2, 1967. A doting grandma (Lady Bird) pushes her grandchild (Lyn Nugent) in front of the White House. As peaceful as this image is, Lady Bird was never far from constant concerns of her family’s public position: 

“They [Luci and Pat Nugent] will go to the Bahamas sometime this week, just when I don’t really want to know. I understand Luci’s reasoning for not wanting to give out this information. In the climate of the day, with bitterness and riots, as carefree a little soul as she is, she does not want to advertise the time when both she and Pat will be on a plane.”

Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 606.  Photo c6157-6a, public domain. 

A subject that had been very much on my mind over the weekend was our ‘coming down off the mountain’—our departure from this place. On Sunday there was a poll that showed a distinct downward trend in the number of people who approved of Lyndon’s handling of the war in Vietnam. Our own decision, our hope, our determination, is to leave when this term ends. but how to tell it to the world, and when—in the fall, as John Connally suggested? Or not until March 1968—my own idea? Nevertheless, it does seem the leaves of autumn are falling rather early, since there are eighteen months left of this term.

 Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 605.  July 31, 1967. 

July 7, 1967. Lady Bird records a trip to Lockhart, Texas (self-proclaimed BBQ capital of the world) in her diary:

"The whole visit to Lockhart filled me with pride, that this little Texas town of of six thousand population had the spark and the get-up-and-get to make the most of its Court House square. The focal point of the square is the old white limestone Victorian-style Court House, described by Mr. Zisman, the restoration architect, as ‘a structure ugly enough to be beautiful.’ There must be at least one hundred Court Houses in Texas of this vintage, built in the 1890s—unbelievable accumulations of turrets, towers, domes, gingerbread, columns, and carvings."

Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 597.  Photo via Wikimedia Commons.
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July 7, 1967. Lady Bird records a trip to Lockhart, Texas (self-proclaimed BBQ capital of the world) in her diary:

"The whole visit to Lockhart filled me with pride, that this little Texas town of of six thousand population had the spark and the get-up-and-get to make the most of its Court House square. The focal point of the square is the old white limestone Victorian-style Court House, described by Mr. Zisman, the restoration architect, as ‘a structure ugly enough to be beautiful.’ There must be at least one hundred Court Houses in Texas of this vintage, built in the 1890s—unbelievable accumulations of turrets, towers, domes, gingerbread, columns, and carvings."

Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 597.  Photo via Wikimedia Commons.

June 25, 1967. While Chairman Kosygin and President Johnson meet at Glassboro, Lady Bird. Liz Carpenter, and Lynda spend the afternoon with Mrs. Lyudmila Gvishiani, the daughter of Chairman Kosygin.  Mrs. Betty Hughes, the wife of the Governor of New Jersey, serves as hostess. Lady Bird recorded in her diary:

“As we flew along the Atlantic coast Betty showed her a public beach where anybody could come for twenty-five cents, with bath houses for changing clothes…and the long stretch of the Atlantic and the endless sandy beach.  There were thousands of people sunning and swimming.  It was a great sight.  We could see the boardwalk and the big hotels, and I was every bit as interested as Mrs. Gvishiana.

It was apparent from the beginning that Lynda Bird took to her and she, I believe, to Lynda.  They talked mostly to each other.  Betty Hughes, our official hostess, was an excellent, highly amusing talker.  I was rather quiet and so was Liz.  There was never any need for an interpreter.  Our guest of honor was indeed unpretentious and easy to be with.

Then the weathered, gray clapboard house right on the shore of the Atlantic came into view.  This house had been the New Jersey Governor’s summer residence for a number of years and at present it housed Governor and Mrs. Hughes and about seven of their ten children, not to mention the numerous visitors that are always in tow with children.”

—Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 537-538. LBJ Presidential Library photos C5810-3a, C5812-2a, C5812-31a, C5813-11, C5814-29, and C5829-4a; images are in the public domain.

June 10, 1967. Lady Bird Johnson and Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall enjoy a Maine lobster feast. The two are Down East for the “New England: Then and Now” trip: you can watch the Navy Film of their travels for lots more. 

June 10, 1967. Lady Bird Johnson and Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall enjoy a Maine lobster feast. The two are Down East for the “New England: Then and Now” trip: you can watch the Navy Film of their travels for lots more. 

(Source: lbjlibrary.org)