August 22, 1967. His Imperial Majesty, Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, Shahanshah of Iran, arrives for a State Visit. LBJ and the Shah exchange remarks in the arrival ceremony. According to Lady Bird: 

“Lyndon, in his speech of welcome, spoke of our several meetings with the Shah and of Iran’s economy which has been growing at about 10 percent a year and its gains against illiteracy: ‘You are winning progress without violence and without any bloodshed—a lesson that others have still to learn.’ Then the Shah, speaking without notes, in perfect English but rather hesitantly, made a brief, earnest talk, disarming in its simplicity and its complete difference from the trite lines that are often read in a monotone voice at an arrival ceremony.”

After dinner that night, the Johnsons and their guests watched The American Ballet Theater perform “Rodeo,” featuring “cowgirls and square dancers….delightfully incongruous under the East Room chandeliers.”
—Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 616-8.

August 22, 1967. His Imperial Majesty, Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, Shahanshah of Iran, arrives for a State Visit. LBJ and the Shah exchange remarks in the arrival ceremony. According to Lady Bird: 

“Lyndon, in his speech of welcome, spoke of our several meetings with the Shah and of Iran’s economy which has been growing at about 10 percent a year and its gains against illiteracy: ‘You are winning progress without violence and without any bloodshed—a lesson that others have still to learn.’ Then the Shah, speaking without notes, in perfect English but rather hesitantly, made a brief, earnest talk, disarming in its simplicity and its complete difference from the trite lines that are often read in a monotone voice at an arrival ceremony.”

After dinner that night, the Johnsons and their guests watched The American Ballet Theater perform “Rodeo,” featuring “cowgirls and square dancers….delightfully incongruous under the East Room chandeliers.”

—Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 616-8.

August 22, 1967. LBJ meets with Walter Washington, Chairman of the New York City Housing Authority, and LBJ’s pick for the new Mayor-Commissioner of Washington, DC. Washington will be the very first African-American Mayor of a large U.S. city. The President calls upon the Mayor of New York—and the First Lady—to help make Washington a success. According to the Daily Diary, LBJ tells Lady Bird:

 “”We talked to Walter and he says he wants to try the job, and now we’re going to see [New York] Mayor Lindsay and see if he can help make the transition easier. And then we’ll depend on you to help Walter to do it. I don’t want him on my neck. You get his wife and you all get on that crime thing.’” 

Top: Walter Washington, via Wikipedia: Bottom. Mayor Lindsay—check out his body language!—and LBJ in their meeting that day. LBJ Library photo # 6380-7, public domain. 

August 22, 1967. In this memo, Rostow informs the President that Hanoi has rejected visa applications for Marcovich and Aubrac.
—Memo, Rostow to LBJ, 8/22/67, #1a, “Kissinger—Peace Contact,” Files of Walt Rostow, National Security File, Box 9.

August 22, 1967. In this memo, Rostow informs the President that Hanoi has rejected visa applications for Marcovich and Aubrac.

—Memo, Rostow to LBJ, 8/22/67, #1a, “Kissinger—Peace Contact,” Files of Walt Rostow, National Security File, Box 9.

August 18, 1967. Herbert Marcovich and Raymond Aubrac, two Frenchmen, send a request for travel visas to Hanoi. 
In The Vantage Point, President Johnson explains that during the summer a group of scientists and intellectuals had met in Paris and selected Marcovich and Aubrac as two intermediaries who could possibly be successful at negotiating peace between the United States and North Vietnam. 
As a result, the United States attempts to send word through these unofficial channels about an upcoming, temporary bombing halt that they are hoping will result in prompt and productive discussions with the North Vietnamese.
—French flag under the Arc de Triomphe. Photo by r.g-s.

August 18, 1967. Herbert Marcovich and Raymond Aubrac, two Frenchmen, send a request for travel visas to Hanoi.

In The Vantage Point, President Johnson explains that during the summer a group of scientists and intellectuals had met in Paris and selected Marcovich and Aubrac as two intermediaries who could possibly be successful at negotiating peace between the United States and North Vietnam.

As a result, the United States attempts to send word through these unofficial channels about an upcoming, temporary bombing halt that they are hoping will result in prompt and productive discussions with the North Vietnamese.

—French flag under the Arc de Triomphe. Photo by r.g-s.

“The history of the labor movement in America is a lesson in responsibility.”

“The movement began at a time when workers were treated more as commodities than as human beings, when most men and women were without power to affect the conditions and wages of their working lives, and when the laws offered no protection for collective action.

“In another country, or in different hands, the workers’ protest against these conditions might have degenerated into sustained violence. There are always some who glorify violence as the midwife of progress. There are always some who mistakenly equate hatred with determination, force with justice.

“But the American labor movement learned early that violence is the sure road to disaster. Labor in this country organized not to destroy, but to demand a part of the American dream. As a result, the American worker today enjoys a prosperity and a security unknown to any other workingman in the history of the world.

“Now, on this 73d Labor Day, America and her labor movement have much to celebrate.

“More Americans—76.2 million of us, 1.6 million more than on last Labor Day—are at work than ever before. The unemployment rate, now 3.9 percent, has been below 4 percent during all but one month in the past year and a half. This is the longest period of sustained low unemployment since the early 1950s. Our per capita disposable personal income has reached $2,717—a 3.6 percent increase in purchasing power over the past year. American workingmen have mightily contributed to, and benefited from, these achievements.

“But our work is not done, if we only magnify our own affluence. Years ago labor fought to awaken the social conscience of those who owned and managed property and production. Today our common challenge is to extend the promise of America to those who are as unfamiliar with it as the railroad workers and coal miners were 70 years ago.

“In a land of plenty, one out of every seven persons lives in poverty.

“Some are the victims of discrimination because of their race, their religion, their sex, or their age.

“We must cure these ills. We must create more jobs, and train the men and women to fill them. We must guarantee the right of every citizen to become the best that there is within him to be.

“In the 1930s, the labor movement spoke on behalf of the forgotten many to the privileged few. Today, it must continue to speak—more firmly than ever-on behalf of the disadvantaged minority.”…

Statement by President Johnson: Labor Day, August 16, 1967


"Man’s greatest hope for world peace lies in understanding his fellow man. Nations, like individuals, fear that which is strange and unfamiliar. The more we see and hear of those things which are common to all people, the less likely we are to fight over those issues which set us apart.
"So the challenge is to communicate.
"No technological advance offers a greater opportunity for meeting this challenge than the alliance of space exploration and communications. Since the advent of the communications satellite, the linking of one nation to another is no longer dependent on telephone lines, microwaves or cables under the sea. Just as man has orbited the earth to explore the universe beyond, we can orbit satellites to send our voices or televise our activities to all peoples of this globe."

President Johnson’s Special Message to the Congress on Communications Policy, August 14, 1967. The satellites pictured are replicas of those used to broadcast the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City to the U.S and Japan. (Via NASA.)

"Man’s greatest hope for world peace lies in understanding his fellow man. Nations, like individuals, fear that which is strange and unfamiliar. The more we see and hear of those things which are common to all people, the less likely we are to fight over those issues which set us apart.

"So the challenge is to communicate.

"No technological advance offers a greater opportunity for meeting this challenge than the alliance of space exploration and communications. Since the advent of the communications satellite, the linking of one nation to another is no longer dependent on telephone lines, microwaves or cables under the sea. Just as man has orbited the earth to explore the universe beyond, we can orbit satellites to send our voices or televise our activities to all peoples of this globe."

President Johnson’s Special Message to the Congress on Communications Policy, August 14, 1967. The satellites pictured are replicas of those used to broadcast the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City to the U.S and Japan. (Via NASA.)

August 11, 1967. In this memo to the President, Walt Rostow provides a summary result of a recent air strike against North Vietnam.
—Memo, Rostow to LBJ, 8/11/67, #57, “Vietnam, memos to the President, 8/3-27/67,” Vietnam Country File, National Security File, Box 56.

August 11, 1967. In this memo to the President, Walt Rostow provides a summary result of a recent air strike against North Vietnam.

—Memo, Rostow to LBJ, 8/11/67, #57, “Vietnam, memos to the President, 8/3-27/67,” Vietnam Country File, National Security File, Box 56.

August 9, 1967. Senator John Stennis, as head of the Senate Preparedness Investigating Subcommittee, begins hearings regarding the conduct and effectiveness of the bombing campaign over North Vietnam. Unlike Senator Fulbright, Stennis believes that the bombing of North Vietnam has been too limited and needs to be escalated in order to ensure a more decisive victory in the Vietnam War. 
—(left to right) Senator John Stennis, President Johnson, Senator Herman Talmadge. LBJ Library photo A3037-21; image is in the public domain. 

August 9, 1967. Senator John Stennis, as head of the Senate Preparedness Investigating Subcommittee, begins hearings regarding the conduct and effectiveness of the bombing campaign over North Vietnam. Unlike Senator Fulbright, Stennis believes that the bombing of North Vietnam has been too limited and needs to be escalated in order to ensure a more decisive victory in the Vietnam War.

—(left to right) Senator John Stennis, President Johnson, Senator Herman Talmadge. LBJ Library photo A3037-21; image is in the public domain. 

It’s strange. You feel soothed and happy by the companionship of your daughter and your son-in-law, and the fine young people who are their friends and the members of your staff. And the cool, brisk, shiny beauty of the day. But simultaneously, you are way down and grieved, emotionally wearied by the troubles that you must try to solve—the growing virus of the riots, the rising list of Vietnam casualties, criticism from your own friends, or former friends, in Congress—and most of the complaining is coming from the Democrats.

August 13, 1967. Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 611.

August 27, 1967. The Daily Diary describes President Johnson’s trip to Dupont Circle to look at “hippies.”

“As the car turned onto Independence Avenue, the President said that he would really like to take a drive out to Dupont Circle and to the 18th and Columbia Road area to look at “hippies,” because he’d never seen one, he said…

At Dupont Circle, the President asked Mrs. Johnson to try to find some “hippies” for him to see—not many were out, but the President did get to see a couple of them. The car followed the outer section of the circle two times around, and then moved to the inner section…for two times around. The second time around the President got a good look at the long haired, necklace draped, rope tied clothed fellows sitting around on the benches. He took special interest in one who had a bundle of pamphlets under his arm, distributing them to anyone who would take them.”

Photo of Dupont Circle from Google Maps Streetview.

Photo of “Hitchhiker with His Dog, ‘Tripper’, on U.S. 66.” from photographer Charles O’Rear as part of the Environmental Protection Agency’s DOCUMERICA project. Check out more O’Rear photos from the project on the National Archives’ flickr page

August 23, 1967. NSC staff member Nathaniel Davis sends this memo to President Johnson updating him on a Soviet espionage case involving two Americans who were “conspiring to deliver national defense information to the Russians.”
Memo, Davis to LBJ, 8/23/67, #13, “Non-Vietnam: July - September 1967,” Files of Walt Rostow, NSF, Box 16, LBJ Presidential Library.

August 23, 1967. NSC staff member Nathaniel Davis sends this memo to President Johnson updating him on a Soviet espionage case involving two Americans who were “conspiring to deliver national defense information to the Russians.”

Memo, Davis to LBJ, 8/23/67, #13, “Non-Vietnam: July - September 1967,” Files of Walt Rostow, NSF, Box 16, LBJ Presidential Library.

August 17, 1967. Lady Bird visits Nichols Avenue and the Frederick Douglass home in Washington, DC, to view the work of local teenagers as part of the Trail Blazers project. The program was begun under the Society for a More Beautiful Capital project, and the teenagers involved are working on designing a park near the Smithsonian Neighborhood Museum on Nichols Avenue, creating a picnic area at the Frederick Douglass home, and building tent shelters at Camp Avalon.

LBJ Presidential Library photos C6339-19, C6339-36, and C6340-8a; images are in the public domain.

August 15, 1967. Alfred Jenkins, a Foreign Service Officer detailed to the National Security Council staff, prepares a memo describing the violence that is taking place in Canton (now Guangzhou) as a result of the Chinese Cultural Revolution:

“…official broadcasts continue to describe incidents of violence and disorder in many parts of China, but the situation in Canton is especially chaotic.
…Other debriefings indicate that individual acts of violence, robbery and looting are increasing, largely as a consequence of the presence in Canton of Red Guards from the outside, who are no longer provided free food, housing and transportation.
…There has been a substantial influx of Red Guards, peasant and worker activists and refugees into Canton from the troubled countryside. Many of these reportedly hope to proceed to Hong Kong, either to demonstrate against the British or to escape the mainland turbulence.”
—memo, Jenkins to Jorden, 8/15/67, #43, “CHICOM - Cultural Revolution, July-December 1967,” Files of Alfred Jenkins, National Security FIle, Box 2, LBJ Presidential Library.

1984 Map from the Perry-Castaneda Library Map Collection.

August 15, 1967. Alfred Jenkins, a Foreign Service Officer detailed to the National Security Council staff, prepares a memo describing the violence that is taking place in Canton (now Guangzhou) as a result of the Chinese Cultural Revolution:

“…official broadcasts continue to describe incidents of violence and disorder in many parts of China, but the situation in Canton is especially chaotic.

…Other debriefings indicate that individual acts of violence, robbery and looting are increasing, largely as a consequence of the presence in Canton of Red Guards from the outside, who are no longer provided free food, housing and transportation.

…There has been a substantial influx of Red Guards, peasant and worker activists and refugees into Canton from the troubled countryside. Many of these reportedly hope to proceed to Hong Kong, either to demonstrate against the British or to escape the mainland turbulence.”

—memo, Jenkins to Jorden, 8/15/67, #43, “CHICOM - Cultural Revolution, July-December 1967,” Files of Alfred Jenkins, National Security FIle, Box 2, LBJ Presidential Library.

1984 Map from the Perry-Castaneda Library Map Collection.

August 10, 1967.

“Today began in the strangest way.  Sometime in the very early morning hours I came awake as I do at the slightest sound or movement, and I thought I could hear a creaking of the boards or of the walls in this old house.  I thought of all the White House ghost stories—completely undisturbed by them, however.  And then I just knew there was somebody in the room—somebody coming toward the bed.  With no sense of fright I reached out my hand over the side of the bed and a hand closed upon it.  I said, ‘Who is this?’ Lynda’s voice answered: ‘Mama, I want to talk to you.’
She sat down on the side of the bed, and I whispered, ‘Let’s go to your room.’  But it was too late.  Lyndon was awake.  Sleepily he rose on his elbow, reached for the light and said, ‘What’s going on?’
I felt I knew what it was.  Some lift of excitement in Lynda’s voice, some feeling that she was trying to talk to me, but was not quite ready when I had watched her get dressed to go out for the date the evening before, had made me think it was about Chuck Robb—that she was getting more interested in him—just how interested I wasn’t sure.  She said, ‘Mother, Daddy, I am in love.  I want to get married.”
—Lady Bird Johnson A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 552.

Lynda Bird Johnson with President Johnson in the Oval Office on August 10, 1967. LBJ Presidential Library photo C6242-05; image is in the public domain.

August 10, 1967.

“Today began in the strangest way.  Sometime in the very early morning hours I came awake as I do at the slightest sound or movement, and I thought I could hear a creaking of the boards or of the walls in this old house.  I thought of all the White House ghost stories—completely undisturbed by them, however.  And then I just knew there was somebody in the room—somebody coming toward the bed.  With no sense of fright I reached out my hand over the side of the bed and a hand closed upon it.  I said, ‘Who is this?’ Lynda’s voice answered: ‘Mama, I want to talk to you.’

She sat down on the side of the bed, and I whispered, ‘Let’s go to your room.’  But it was too late.  Lyndon was awake.  Sleepily he rose on his elbow, reached for the light and said, ‘What’s going on?’

I felt I knew what it was.  Some lift of excitement in Lynda’s voice, some feeling that she was trying to talk to me, but was not quite ready when I had watched her get dressed to go out for the date the evening before, had made me think it was about Chuck Robb—that she was getting more interested in him—just how interested I wasn’t sure.  She said, ‘Mother, Daddy, I am in love.  I want to get married.”

Lady Bird Johnson A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 552.

Lynda Bird Johnson with President Johnson in the Oval Office on August 10, 1967. LBJ Presidential Library photo C6242-05; image is in the public domain.

August 9, 1967. The House of Representatives votes down, 160-244, a resolution to disapprove LBJ’s proposed reorganization of Washington, DC. The resolution therefore stands. Republicans split, 110-64 for the resolution and against the home-rule plan, as did southern Democrats (47-39 for the resolution/against the plan). Supporters of home rule argued that denying residents of the capital, a city 65% black, was a violation of civil rights, and the majority of the House agrees. 
With the failure of the resolution, for the first time, the nation’s capital will have some measure of representative government. The President will appoint a city commissioner, to be known as Mayor, a deputy commissioner, and a nine-member council. They replace the three-member commission that previously ran the District, and affords more representation for the diversity of the city. Now the fight moves to the proportion of whites and black that LBJ will appoint, and who will hold the position of Mayor. LBJ hopes that this measure will be only an interim plan until Congress passes home rule, and residents can elect their own representatives, but this will not happen in 1967.
Congressional Quarterly Almanac, Vol. XXIII, 1967, p. 1024-1026. Photo via US Marines. 

August 9, 1967. The House of Representatives votes down, 160-244, a resolution to disapprove LBJ’s proposed reorganization of Washington, DC. The resolution therefore stands. Republicans split, 110-64 for the resolution and against the home-rule plan, as did southern Democrats (47-39 for the resolution/against the plan). Supporters of home rule argued that denying residents of the capital, a city 65% black, was a violation of civil rights, and the majority of the House agrees. 

With the failure of the resolution, for the first time, the nation’s capital will have some measure of representative government. The President will appoint a city commissioner, to be known as Mayor, a deputy commissioner, and a nine-member council. They replace the three-member commission that previously ran the District, and affords more representation for the diversity of the city. Now the fight moves to the proportion of whites and black that LBJ will appoint, and who will hold the position of Mayor. LBJ hopes that this measure will be only an interim plan until Congress passes home rule, and residents can elect their own representatives, but this will not happen in 1967.

Congressional Quarterly Almanac, Vol. XXIII, 1967, p. 1024-1026. Photo via US Marines