Presencia, October 9, reports capture “Che” Guevara. Guerrillas reported lost three dead and two seriously wounded and captured, including “Che” in six hour firefight on October 8 with unit of 2nd Rangers, seven kilometers north of Higuera.

Memo, Rostow to LBJ, 10/9/67, #102, “Bolivia, Volume 4,” Country File, NSF, Box 8, LBJ Presidential Library.

Q. Mr. President, have you had any message from anyone in the Far East since your speech last night?

THE PRESIDENT. I don’t understand the full import of your question.

Q. Well, I wondered had there been any diplomatic response from Southeast Asia as a result of what you said last night?

THE PRESIDENT. Are you asking if I have heard from the North Vietnamese?

Q. Among other people, yes, sir.

THE PRESIDENT. Well, I haven’t read everything that has come in. To my knowledge, we haven’t heard from them.

But if some rancher from Australia had wired me congratulations, I wouldn’t want to be caught in a credibility gap by saying I hadn’t heard from that part of the world.

If you are asking about North Vietnam, the answer is, to my knowledge, no.

The President’s News Conference at the LBJ Ranch, September 30, 1967

September 30, 1967.

"We were due to have a family picture made at 11 A.M. today—an event I always approach as an ordeal because it falls to my lot to try to get everybody in the humor…
"We took our seats on the orange sofa in the den….Patrick Lyndon screwed up his face and let out a yell. Everybody went into gyrations trying to amuse him. Luci went for a bottle of milk, and then there followed one of the most hilarious scenes of my lifetime. Lyndon gave Okie instructions on how to shoot the picture, then he stuck the bottle of milk in Lyn’s mouth for a long suck, snatched it out and put it quickly behind my back while we all composed our faces into hopefully appropriate expressions and Okie snapped. This went on time after time, with little Lyn getting madder and madder, hollering louder and louder, and I melting into laughter between snaps until the tears rolled down my cheeks…. And Lyndon looked like the frustrated captain who can’t make his team play right.”

 Lady Bird Johnson  A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 571-572. LBJ Presidential Library contact sheet 1967-09-30-C6787, public domain.

September 30, 1967.

"We were due to have a family picture made at 11 A.M. today—an event I always approach as an ordeal because it falls to my lot to try to get everybody in the humor…

"We took our seats on the orange sofa in the den….Patrick Lyndon screwed up his face and let out a yell. Everybody went into gyrations trying to amuse him. Luci went for a bottle of milk, and then there followed one of the most hilarious scenes of my lifetime. Lyndon gave Okie instructions on how to shoot the picture, then he stuck the bottle of milk in Lyn’s mouth for a long suck, snatched it out and put it quickly behind my back while we all composed our faces into hopefully appropriate expressions and Okie snapped. This went on time after time, with little Lyn getting madder and madder, hollering louder and louder, and I melting into laughter between snaps until the tears rolled down my cheeks…. And Lyndon looked like the frustrated captain who can’t make his team play right.”

 Lady Bird Johnson  A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 571-572. LBJ Presidential Library contact sheet 1967-09-30-C6787, public domain.

September 29, 1967. In the midst of the ongoing attempts at peace negotiations, President Johnson delivers a speech before the National Legislative Conference in San Antonio, Texas. He outlines what will become known as the “San Antonio Formula”: 

“I am ready to talk with Ho Chi Minh, and other chiefs of state concerned, tomorrow.
I am ready to have Secretary Rusk meet with their foreign minister tomorrow.
I am ready to send a trusted representative of America to any spot on this earth to talk in public or private with a spokesman of Hanoi.
We have twice sought to have the issue of Vietnam dealt with by the United Nations-and twice Hanoi has refused.
Our desire to negotiate peace—through the United Nations or out—has been made very, very clear to Hanoi—directly and many times through third parties.
As we have told Hanoi time and time and time again, the heart of the matter is really this: The United States is willing to stop all aerial and naval bombardment of North Vietnam when this will lead promptly to productive discussions. We, of course, assume that while discussions proceed, North Vietnam would not take advantage of the bombing cessation or limitation.”

—Read the full speech at the American Presidency Project. Photo: Ho Chi Minh and East German President Wilhelm Pieck in 1957. Via Wkimedia Commons. 

September 29, 1967. In the midst of the ongoing attempts at peace negotiations, President Johnson delivers a speech before the National Legislative Conference in San Antonio, Texas. He outlines what will become known as the “San Antonio Formula”: 

“I am ready to talk with Ho Chi Minh, and other chiefs of state concerned, tomorrow.

I am ready to have Secretary Rusk meet with their foreign minister tomorrow.

I am ready to send a trusted representative of America to any spot on this earth to talk in public or private with a spokesman of Hanoi.

We have twice sought to have the issue of Vietnam dealt with by the United Nations-and twice Hanoi has refused.

Our desire to negotiate peace—through the United Nations or out—has been made very, very clear to Hanoi—directly and many times through third parties.

As we have told Hanoi time and time and time again, the heart of the matter is really this: The United States is willing to stop all aerial and naval bombardment of North Vietnam when this will lead promptly to productive discussions. We, of course, assume that while discussions proceed, North Vietnam would not take advantage of the bombing cessation or limitation.”

Read the full speech at the American Presidency Project. Photo: Ho Chi Minh and East German President Wilhelm Pieck in 1957. Via Wkimedia Commons. 

Sept. 28, 1967. LBJ is in South Texas, visiting the US-Mexico border area stricken by Hurricane Beulah:

“The thing I want to stress particularly by coming here this afternoon and visiting some of the hospital centers and the food centers, and flying over the area, was to let these people know that their Government cares for them, and let our neighbors who are the unfortunate victims of distress across the river know that we care for them, and that we are a compassionate and understanding Government. And in the hour of need, we are there.”

—Lyndon Johnson, The President’s News Conference at Harlingen, Texas, Following an Inspection of Hurricane Damage. LBJ Library photo # A4863-30a, public domain. 

Sept. 28, 1967. LBJ is in South Texas, visiting the US-Mexico border area stricken by Hurricane Beulah:

The thing I want to stress particularly by coming here this afternoon and visiting some of the hospital centers and the food centers, and flying over the area, was to let these people know that their Government cares for them, and let our neighbors who are the unfortunate victims of distress across the river know that we care for them, and that we are a compassionate and understanding Government. And in the hour of need, we are there.”

—Lyndon Johnson, The President’s News Conference at Harlingen, Texas, Following an Inspection of Hurricane Damage. LBJ Library photo # A4863-30a, public domain. 

Sept. 28, 1967. Accompanied by Texas Governor John Connally, LBJ heads to the US-Mexico border, recently stricken by severe flooding from Hurricane Beulah (map of region here). The slow-moving storm has cut a broad swath of destruction. A 14-foot surge swept across South Padre Island, in the Gulf of Mexico, and the overflowing Rio Grande flooded houses to the rooftops in Harlingen, TX. 

Both sides of the border have been devastated, and volunteers, especially medical personnel, have responded with an outpouring of assistance. The US Army has even dispatched aid helicopters to remote areas of Mexico like Comales (map). 

LBJ is on his way to visit a high school-turned-emergency hospital in Rio Grande City that (according to the President’s Daily Diary) houses 1,500 to 2,000 people, 99% of them Mexican nationals. 

LBJ photo via LBJ Library, #A4871-24, public domain. Other photos via The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. Lots more in their digital archives here. More on Beulah via NOAA.

Sept. 28, 1967. 1:15 PM. LBJ and Lady Bird head to Texas, with Yuki leading the way!
LBJ Library photo #A4872-6, public domain. 

Sept. 28, 1967. 1:15 PM. LBJ and Lady Bird head to Texas, with Yuki leading the way!

LBJ Library photo #A4872-6, public domain. 

Sept. 28, 1967. 9:54 AM. On a phone call with Republican Minority Leader Everett Dirksen, LBJ complains about public criticism about Vietnam from Senators Thruston MortonWilliam Fulbright, and Clifford Case

At about 8:38, the President says: 

"Now, we don’t have a single military man or a single civilian man who thinks that these people are ready to talk now. We think they’re relying on the Senate—these speeches up there. And I think somebody’s just got to tell these Senators, ‘If you want to have some influence, come down here and we’ll expose you and debate with you right in the Cabinet Room. But for God’s sake, don’t tell Ho Chi Minh that if he holds out another month we may stop hitting him, because that what he’s hoping he can do.’”

Sept. 26, 1967. Lady Bird greets Aissa Diori, wife of Niger President Hamani Diori, on their State visit to the White House. President Diori has been in power since 1960: he will be deposed in 1974, seven years after this photo was taken. According to this article in the U.S. paper The Times-News, Mrs. Diori will die in the coup.  
LBJ Library photo C6729-12, public domain. The man between Lady Bird and Aissa Diori is Under Secretary of State Nicholas Katzenbach. 

Sept. 26, 1967. Lady Bird greets Aissa Diori, wife of Niger President Hamani Diori, on their State visit to the White House. President Diori has been in power since 1960: he will be deposed in 1974, seven years after this photo was taken. According to this article in the U.S. paper The Times-News, Mrs. Diori will die in the coup.  

LBJ Library photo C6729-12, public domain. The man between Lady Bird and Aissa Diori is Under Secretary of State Nicholas Katzenbach. 

Monday, Sept. 25, 1967. Last night was one of those bleak nights when the shadows take over. We both woke up about 3:30 AM and talked and talked and talked about when and how to make the statement that Lyndon is not going to be a candidate again.

Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 627.

Sept. 22, 1967. LBJ and assistant Marvin Watson. 
LBJ Library photo #A4821-10, public domain. 

Sept. 22, 1967. LBJ and assistant Marvin Watson. 

LBJ Library photo #A4821-10, public domain. 

September 20, 1967. Lady Bird stops in Montevideo, Minnesota on her four-day Crossroads USA tour. She visits South Dakota, Minnesota, Michigan, Missouri, Indiana, Wisconsin, and Illinois. Watch a video of highlights from her trip here. 

September 20, 1967. Lady Bird stops in Montevideo, Minnesota on her four-day Crossroads USA tour. She visits South Dakota, Minnesota, Michigan, Missouri, Indiana, Wisconsin, and Illinois. Watch a video of highlights from her trip here

September 20, 1967. Greece and Turkey are in discussions regarding the future of the island nation of Cyprus. Both nations are arguing for an increase in their military and political power in the nation. Greece is in favor of Enosis, a term used to describe a future in which Cyprus would become incorporated with Greece. Turkey, however, is in favor of partition, where Cyprus would be divided between Greece and Turkey.
Cyprus was established as an independent nation as part of the London-Zurich agreements in 1960. Since that time, the responsibility for defense and governance of the nation has been split between Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots because the citizens of the nation are split between a Greek and Turkish ethnic background. 
The discussions between Greece and Turkey are resulting in little success. In a telegram to the Department of State, Ambassador to Greece Phillips Talbot states:

“King Constantine last night expressed to me his “fed-upness” with hardened Turkish position which had brought to naught Prime Ministerial meeting on which he had pinned strong hopes.”

—Map, Cyprus: A Status Report, 5/27/66, #98, “Cyprus, Volume 17,” Country File, NSF, Box 123, LBJ Presidential Library.
Read the full telegram in the Foreign Relations of the United States.

September 20, 1967. Greece and Turkey are in discussions regarding the future of the island nation of Cyprus. Both nations are arguing for an increase in their military and political power in the nation. Greece is in favor of Enosis, a term used to describe a future in which Cyprus would become incorporated with Greece. Turkey, however, is in favor of partition, where Cyprus would be divided between Greece and Turkey.

Cyprus was established as an independent nation as part of the London-Zurich agreements in 1960. Since that time, the responsibility for defense and governance of the nation has been split between Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots because the citizens of the nation are split between a Greek and Turkish ethnic background.

The discussions between Greece and Turkey are resulting in little success. In a telegram to the Department of State, Ambassador to Greece Phillips Talbot states:

King Constantine last night expressed to me his “fed-upness” with hardened Turkish position which had brought to naught Prime Ministerial meeting on which he had pinned strong hopes.”

—Map, Cyprus: A Status Report, 5/27/66, #98, “Cyprus, Volume 17,” Country File, NSF, Box 123, LBJ Presidential Library.

Read the full telegram in the Foreign Relations of the United States.